Monthly Archives: January 2015

David Suzuki on the 59th minute and exponential growth

Posted in astronomy, astrophysics, biology, bridge to nowhere, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide capture, Carl Sagan, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, climate education, demand-side solutions, ecology, economics, engineering, environment, ethics, forecasting, geophysics, IPCC, mathematics, maths, meteorology, physics, population biology, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, science education, sociology, statistics | 3 Comments

The designers of our climate

Originally posted on …and Then There's Physics:
Okay, I finally succumbed and actually waded through some of the new paper by Monckton, Soon, Legates & Briggs called Why models run hot: results from an irreducibly simple climate model. I…

Posted in astrophysics, bridge to nowhere, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide capture, carbon dioxide sequestration, Carbon Tax, Carl Sagan, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, climate education, differential equations, ecology, economics, engineering, environment, ethics, forecasting, fossil fuel divestment, geoengineering, geophysics, humanism, IPCC, mathematics, mathematics education, maths, meteorology, methane, NASA, NCAR, Neill deGrasse Tyson, NOAA, oceanography, open data, open source scientific software, physics, politics, population biology, Principles of Planetary Climate, probabilistic programming, R, rationality, reasonableness, reproducible research, risk, science, science education, scientific publishing, sociology, solar power, statistics, testing, the right to know | Leave a comment

Climate records at Blue Hill Meteorological Observatory

The Blue Hill Meteorological Observatory (Wikipedia) is located not 6 miles from my home. An iconic structure, it is also the oldest continuously operating meteorological outpost, and has the longest scientific climate record in North America. Thought I’d share some … Continue reading

Posted in carbon dioxide, climate, climate change, climate education, ecology, environment, forecasting, meteorology, NOAA, oceanography, physics, science, science education, statistics | 2 Comments

Nor’easter

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It’s the Trend, Stupid

Originally posted on Open Mind:
Both NASA and NOAA report 2014 as the hottest year on record. Despite the new #1, neither the news itself nor the response to it has surprised me. The news that last year was so…

Posted in carbon dioxide, citizen science, climate, climate change, climate education, ecology, energy, environment, forecasting, geophysics, history, mathematics, mathematics education, maths, meteorology, NOAA, obfuscating data, physics, rationality, reasonableness, science, science education, statistics, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Codium fragile, for Saturday, 17th January 2015

With today’s post, I’m beginning a new tradition at 667 per cm, posting a potpourri of short observations collected during the week, not necessarily having dense citations to work which inspired them. (Although if interested, please do ask and I’ll … Continue reading

Posted in art, arXiv, astronomy, astrophysics, atheism, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide capture, Carbon Tax, Carl Sagan, chemistry, citizen science, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, climate education, conservation, consumption, decentralized electric power generation, demand-side solutions, ecology, economics, energy, engineering, environment, forecasting, fossil fuel divestment, geoengineering, history, humanism, investment in wind and solar energy, IPCC, meteorology, methane, microgrids, NASA, Neill deGrasse Tyson, new forms of scientific peer review, NOAA, notes, nuclear power, oceanography, open data, open source scientific software, physics, politics, Principles of Planetary Climate, rationality, reasonableness, reproducible research, science, science education, scientific publishing, sociology, the right to know | Leave a comment

US$60/ton of Carbon

There’s a new paper out, by Frances Moore and Delavane Diaz of Stanford University, on the Social Cost of Carbon. It is “Temperature impacts on economic growth warrant a stringent mitigation policy“, Nature Climate Change, 12th January 2015. The principal … Continue reading

Posted in carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide capture, carbon dioxide sequestration, Carbon Tax, civilization, climate, climate change, climate education, ecology, economics, efficiency, engineering, environment, fossil fuel divestment, geoengineering, geophysics, IPCC, meteorology, physics, science, science education | Leave a comment

Where are sea levels? Why? And things which affect measurements

New post by Stefan Rahmstorf, at RealClimate: “A new sea level curve“.

Posted in astronomy, astrophysics, climate, climate change, climate education, ecology, environment, forecasting, geophysics, meteorology, NOAA, oceanography, physics, rationality, reasonableness, science, science education, statistics | Leave a comment

Hestia: A glimpse at greenhouse gas emissions enforcement

Posted in bridge to nowhere, carbon dioxide, Carbon Tax, citizen science, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, climate education, conservation, consumption, decentralized electric power generation, demand-side solutions, ecology, economics, education, efficiency, energy reduction, engineering, environment, ethics, fossil fuel divestment, geophysics, investing, investment in wind and solar energy, IPCC, meteorology, methane, natural gas, NOAA, oceanography, physics, politics, population biology, Principles of Planetary Climate, rationality, reasonableness, science, science education, sociology, solar power, statistics, wind power | Tagged | Leave a comment

“a day of mourning”

Professor Christian Robert’s a day of mourning. Update: 2015-01-12, 1352 ET From KAL at The Economist: Update: 2015-01-31, 1736 ET And, finally, Sam Harris, who I applaud:

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On the dispensibility of causes

John D Norton wrote “Causation as folk science” in 2003, a piece which highlights the limited role of Aristotlean and Kantian causation in modern science, something which I’ve felt for many years. My perspective is that there’s nothing cause-and-effect in … Continue reading

Posted in civilization, education, rationality, reasonableness, science, science education, scientific publishing, statistics | Tagged | Leave a comment

AIP’s surprisingly good summary of climate change, in detail

The American Institute of Physics has a surprisingly good summary of climate change science and its history, including current issues and how we understand what we do about it. This is something an organization like the American Meteorological Society should … Continue reading

Posted in astronomy, astrophysics, bridge to nowhere, carbon dioxide, Carl Sagan, civilization, climate, climate change, climate education, environment, forecasting, geophysics, IPCC, meteorology, NASA, NOAA, oceanography, physics, Principles of Planetary Climate, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, science education | Leave a comment

Heads-up limit hold’em poker is solved

This is from today’s news in Science. The full citation is: M. Bowling, N. Burch, M. Johanson, O. Tammelin, “Heads-up limit hold’em poker is solved”, Science, 9 January 2015, 347(6218), 145-149, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1259433. See also a University of Alberta site where … Continue reading

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Je Suis Charlie Hebdo

That’s my comment. More reason for atheism, I’d say. Sam Harris may be overly tough on religion, but in this case, he’s spot on. The Economist has a tabular graphic describing the perceived fraction of Muslims in various countries, principally … Continue reading

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Climate Arbitrage

“A textbook definition (Sharpe and Alexander 1990) defines arbitrage as the simultaneous purchase and sale of the same, or essentially similar, security in two different markets at advantageously different prices.” That’s from a book I’m reading by Andrei Shleifer called … Continue reading

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“Atmospheric lifetime of fossil fuel carbon dioxide” (2009)

These basic facts do not appear to be widely known, so it’s a good thing this classic paper is now available in a new, easily accessible form. David Archer, Michael Eby, Victor Brovkin, Andy Ridgwell, Long Cao, Uwe Mikolajewicz, Ken … Continue reading

Posted in astrophysics, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide capture, carbon dioxide sequestration, Carbon Tax, chemistry, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate education, conservation, consumption, demand-side solutions, differential equations, ecology, economics, education, energy, energy reduction, engineering, environment, fossil fuel divestment, geoengineering, geophysics, IPCC, meteorology, methane, natural gas, NCAR, NOAA, oceanography, physics, Principles of Planetary Climate, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, science education | 1 Comment

Notes on distributed generation of electricity and stability of microgrids

Here are some links on the question. Distributed generation, from Wikipedia Decentralized control techniques applied to electric power distributed generation in microgrids, a doctoral thesis by Juan Carlos Vásquez Quintero Distributed generation and microgrids for small island electrification in developing … Continue reading

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More on ice sheets and 400 ppm CO2

Posted in carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide capture, carbon dioxide sequestration, Carbon Tax, citizen science, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate education, conservation, ecology, environment, forecasting, geophysics, meteorology, oceanography, physics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, science education, the right to know | Leave a comment

Naomi Oreskes and significance testing

Naomi Oreskes has an op-ed in The New York Times today, which intends to defend the severe standards of evidence scientists employ, with special applicability to climate science and their explanation of causation (greenhouse gases produce radiative forcing), attribution (most … Continue reading

Posted in Bayes, Bayesian, citizen science, climate, climate education, mathematics, mathematics education, maths, model comparison, rationality, reasonableness, science, statistics, testing | Leave a comment

On nested equivalence classes of climate models, ordered by computational complexity

I’m digging into the internals of ABC, for professional and scientific reasons. I’ve linked a great tutorial elsewhere, and argued that this framework, advanced by Wood, and Wilkinson (Robert), and Wilkinson (Darren), and Hartig and colleagues, and Robert and colleagues, … Continue reading

Posted in approximate Bayesian computation, Bayes, Bayesian, biology, ecology, environment, forecasting, geophysics, IPCC, mathematics, maths, MCMC, meteorology, NCAR, NOAA, oceanography, optimization, population biology, Principles of Planetary Climate, probabilistic programming, R, science, stochastic algorithms, stochastic search | Leave a comment