Monthly Archives: March 2015

Retro news: Cronkite’s 1980 global warming alert. — The Daily Climate

Retro news: Cronkite's 1980 global warming alert. — The Daily Climate. Yes, people have been warning about this for quite a while. This is also why I doubt the delay can be blamed upon energy company misinformation and obfuscation — … Continue reading

Posted in carbon dioxide, Carl Sagan, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, ecology, environment, history, meteorology, physics, politics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, sea level rise | Leave a comment

Thar be ARRAYS below!

The Ocean Observatories Initiative, and it’s networking technology. Progress! Scripps Institution of Oceanography and WHOI deploy Station Papa. See also. WHOI and Scripps deploy the Irminger Sea node. See also. WHOI and Scripps deploy the Southern Ocean array. See also. … Continue reading

Posted in climate, climate change, ecology, engineering, environment, meteorology, NCAR, NOAA, oceanography, physics, population biology, Principles of Planetary Climate, science, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, time series, WHOI | Leave a comment

2014

(These excellent figures are from Robbie Andrew, Oslo.)

Posted in Anthropocene, carbon dioxide, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, climate education, consumption, ecology, economics, environment, forecasting, fossil fuel divestment, geophysics, IPCC, meteorology, NOAA, oceanography, physics, population biology, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, science education, sea level rise, statistics, time series | Leave a comment

Twelvefold acceleration in Antarctic shelf ice loss over two decades

The story of Antarctic ice shelf melt continues to develop. A new report measures ice loss over the entire two Antarctic continents, finding a twelvefold acceleration in ice loss comparing the interval 2003-2012 to the interval 1994-2003. This is from … Continue reading

Posted in Antarctica, Anthropocene, carbon dioxide, civilization, climate, climate change, climate education, environment, geophysics, oceanography, physics, rationality, science, sea level rise, spatial statistics, statistics, WAIS, WHOI | Leave a comment

Scary Stuff; a Potential Nasty Surprise

If it were to come true, Wally Broecker would earn yet another, deserved scientific accolade: The Great Ocean Conveyor. More from WHOI here. “The climate system is an angry beast and we are poking it with sticks,” said Dr. Wallace … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropocene, bridge to nowhere, carbon dioxide, Carbon Tax, Carl Sagan, citizen science, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, climate education, ecology, education, engineering, environment, forecasting, games of chance, mathematics, maths, meteorology, NOAA, oceanography, physics, Principles of Planetary Climate, rationality, Ray Pierrehumbert, reasonableness, science, science education, sea level rise, sociology, statistics | Leave a comment

Neil deGrasse Tyson on “60 Minutes”

http://www.cbsnews.com/videos/astrophysicist-neil-degrasse-tysons-one-man-mission Hat tip to Dan Satterfield.

Posted in astronomy, astrophysics, Carl Sagan, Neill deGrasse Tyson, physics, science, science education | Leave a comment

“Unbiased Bayes for Big Data: Path of partial posteriors” (Christian Robert)

Unbiased Bayes for Big Data: Path of partial posteriors.

Posted in approximate Bayesian computation, Bayes, Bayesian, mathematics, maths, MCMC, optimization, probabilistic programming, statistics, stochastic algorithms | Leave a comment

“Gray matters [not much, truly]” (Christian Robert)

Gray matters [not much, truly].

Posted in atheism, Boston Ethical Society, capricious gods, citizenship, civilization, education, ethics, history, politics, rationality, reasonableness, the right to know | Leave a comment

“Human activity has nothing big enough to affect Earth”

“Human activity has nothing big enough to affect Earth.” That’s disingenuous and, usually, the speaker knows better but is trying to dissuade an audience from thinking human activity does. Or they parrot someone who is trying to do that. But … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropocene, biology, bridge to nowhere, carbon dioxide, Carbon Tax, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, climate education, consumption, ecology, economics, energy, energy reduction, engineering, environment, ethics, fossil fuel divestment, geophysics, history, investing, investment in wind and solar energy, IPCC, meteorology, methane, natural gas, notes, open data, physics, politics, population biology, reasonableness, risk, science, science education, solar power, statistics, the right to know, time series, wind power | Leave a comment

Dynamic Linear Models package, dlmodeler

I’m checking out the dlmodeler package in R for a work project. It is accompanied by textbooks, G. Petris, S. Petrone, P. Campagnoli, Dynamic Linear Models with R, Springer, 2009 and J. Durbin, S. J. Koopman, Time Series Analysis by … Continue reading

Posted in Bayesian, geophysics, mathematics, maths, oceanography, open source scientific software, Python 3, R, science, sea level rise, state-space models, statistics, stochastic algorithms, time series | Leave a comment

Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods and logistic regression

This post could also be subtitled “Residual deviance isn’t the whole story.” My favorite book on logistic regression is by Dr Joseph Hilbe, Logistic Regression Models, CRC Press, 2009, Chapman & Hill. It is a solidly frequentist text, but its … Continue reading

Posted in Bayes, Bayesian, logistic regression, MCMC, notes, R, statistics, stochastic algorithms, stochastic search | 2 Comments

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, online Nuclear Notebook

In the days before having just (!) climate change with which to concern ourselves, the threat of nuclear weapons loomed large. Although the threat is not extinguished by any means, it is diminished. For example, the United States and Russia … Continue reading

Posted in Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Carl Sagan, citizenship, civilization, climate, ecology, ethics, geophysics, meteorology, nuclear weapons, open data, open source scientific software, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science | Leave a comment

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and Woods Hole, in deep winter

This is from Brian Switzer, and is called “Frozen Woods Hole From Above”. And check out WHOI. Become a member.

Posted in geophysics, NOAA, oceanography, WHOI | Leave a comment

Bayesian change-point analysis for global temperatures, 1850-2010

Professor Peter Congdon reports on two Bayesian models for global temperature shifts in his textbook, Applied Bayesian Modelling, as “Example 6.12: Global temperatures, 1850-2010”, on pages 252-253. A direct link is available online. The first is apparently original with Congdon, … Continue reading

Posted in Bayes, Bayesian, BUGS, climate, climate change, environment, forecasting, information theoretic statistics, mathematics, MCMC, meteorology, rationality, reasonableness, statistics, stochastic algorithms, Uncategorized | 1 Comment