Monthly Archives: May 2015

carbon dioxide and saturation

One of the “climate zombies” that get’s trotted out from time to time and at places on the Internet is the argument of Knut Ångström, trying to rebut the calculations of Svante Arrhenius regarding the impact a doubling of carbon … Continue reading

Posted in astrophysics, carbon dioxide, chemistry, climate, climate change, climate disruption, climate education, climate zombies, geophysics, meteorology, physics, Ray Pierrehumbert, science, science education | Leave a comment

“Andy Lacis writes to Steve Koonin”, on the American Physical Society statement on climate change (from Rabett Run)

See http://rabett.blogspot.com/2015/04/andy-lacis-writes-to-steve-koonin.html. There’s more and related below: http://rabett.blogspot.com/2015/04/ev-costs-at-tipping-point-for-un.html http://rabett.blogspot.com/2015/05/more-on-aps-statement-on-climate-change.html

Posted in carbon dioxide, climate, climate change, climate disruption | 1 Comment

A promise forward …

I’ve made a commitment at Google Plus to detail the implications of underestimated rainfall in terms of precipitation risk. I’m planning to tie this up with my informal work on the Town of Sharon’s water supply, in Sharon, MA.

Posted in chance, citizenship, ecology, ENSO, environment, floods, forecasting, geophysics, meteorology, politics, precipitation, rationality, state-space models, statistics, stochastics | Leave a comment

“Clean burnin’ natural gas …”

The carbon dioxide emissions of the United States are increasing again, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration in their Monthly Energy Review. Guess what fuel is heavily contributing to the rise: Of course, clean burnin’ natural gas: A bridge … Continue reading

Posted in bridge to nowhere, carbon dioxide, Carbon Tax, climate, climate change, climate disruption, conservation, consumption, decentralized electric power generation, decentralized energy, demand-side solutions, ecology, economics, education, environment, exponential growth, fossil fuel divestment, fracking, global warming, investment in wind and solar energy, meteorology, methane, microgrids, natural gas, politics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, science education, statistics, sustainability, temporal myopia, zero carbon | Leave a comment

“Response” (to “…I would be interested to see how one can prove from such varying data that the warming has accelerated over time”), by Tamino

Originally posted on Open Mind:
Some comment replies require more than just a few brief lines. Richard Mallett | May 19, 2015 at 4:28 pm | I see that somebody has been posting replies in italics and within square brackets…

Posted in anemic data, Anthropocene, carbon dioxide, chance, climate, climate change, climate disruption, climate education, denial, ecology, education, forecasting, geophysics, global warming, maths, obfuscating data, open data, physics, politics, rationality, science, science education, sea level rise, statistics, sustainability, time series | 1 Comment

“Cauchy Distribution: Evil or Angel?” (from Xian)

Cauchy Distribution: Evil or Angel?. From Professor Christian Robert.

Posted in arXiv, Bayes, Bayesian, Cauchy distribution, information theoretic statistics, mathematics, maths, optimization, probabilistic programming, probability, rationality, reasonableness, statistics, stochastic algorithms, stochastics, Student t distribution | Leave a comment

On the futility of speaking with (and working with) local politicians

I had a chat with a local politician yesterday, at a party of a mutual friend. It did not go well. Claire and I have been moving a sustainability agenda in town (and elsewhere!) for a few years, and have … Continue reading

Posted in demand-side solutions, environment, ethics, exponential growth, global warming, politics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, sociology, sustainability, transparency, UU Humanists | 2 Comments

Another reason to decentralize electricity generation

There’s a report that a former KGB spy worked on the New York State electric grid for years. The Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg News have both reported on the susceptibility of the electric grid to terrorist attack. No doubt … Continue reading

Posted in decentralized electric power generation, decentralized energy, demand-side solutions, energy, games of chance, investment in wind and solar energy, microgrids, rationality, reasonableness, risk, solar power, wind power, zero carbon | Leave a comment

The pending disintegration of the Larsen B Ice Shelf, Antarctica

Estimates place the disintegration of the remainder of this shelf within 10 years, after losing a chunk the size of the State of Rhode Island in 2002.

Posted in Antarctica, carbon dioxide, climate, climate change, climate disruption, environment, geophysics, global warming, meteorology, NOAA, oceanography, physics, rationality, reasonableness, science, science education, sea level rise, statistics, Uncategorized, WAIS | Leave a comment

Climate Scientist Michael Mann

Professor Michael Mann is a personal hero of mine, principally because he connected, for me, the world of time series and principal components with climate science, showing there might be some small thing I can contribute to the discussion, and … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Climate Scientist Katharine Hayhoe

(From Denial101x)

Posted in carbon dioxide, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, ecology, geophysics, risk, science, sociology, the right to know, UU Humanists | Leave a comment

George Carlin on religion; Ricky Gervais on the Bible

Yeah. Ogden and Sleep, “Explosive eruption of coal and basalt and the end-Permian mass extinction“.

Posted in atheism, capricious gods, carbon dioxide, Carl Sagan, chance, mass extinctions, rationality, reasonableness, UU Humanists | Leave a comment

“el Niño and the Non-Spherical Cow”

Originally posted on Open Mind:
Most people who follow climate science are aware that one of the natural factors which affects global temperate is the el Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). It’s a mode of natural variation in the tropical eastern…

Posted in Anthropocene, bridge to nowhere, carbon dioxide, Carbon Tax, civilization, clean disruption, climate, climate change, climate disruption, climate education, ecology, economics, ENSO, ethics, forecasting, global warming, meteorology, NCAR, NOAA, oceanography, open data, open source scientific software, physics, politics, rationality, Ray Pierrehumbert, reasonableness, reproducible research, risk, science, science education, sea level rise, statistics, stochastics, temporal myopia, time series, transparency | Leave a comment

Brian Swett discusses Boston’s climate future | NOAA Climate.gov

Brian Swett discusses Boston’s climate future | NOAA Climate.gov.

Posted in Boston, climate change, climate disruption, ecology, economics, environment, forecasting, geophysics, global warming, history, investment in wind and solar energy, living shorelines, mass transit, meteorology, NOAA, oceanography, physics, politics, population biology, Principles of Planetary Climate, public transport, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, science education, sea level rise, sociology, statistics, temporal myopia, the right to know, time series, wind power, zero carbon | Leave a comment

“Hot Water”, from Tamino

Originally posted on Open Mind:
Barton Bibler, who works for Florida’s DEP (Department of Environmental Protection), actually spoke about climate change at an official meeting. He even (gasp!) kept notes of the discussion in official minutes. In governor Rick Scott’s…

Posted in bridge to nowhere, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, environment, ethics, geophysics, living shorelines, meteorology, oceanography, politics, rationality, reasonableness, science, science education, sea level rise, temporal myopia, the right to know | Leave a comment

“bikes vs cars”, from Christian Robert

bikes vs cars.

Posted in politics, public transport, risk, temporal myopia, zero carbon | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Jeff’s lecture in Banff (update)

Updated, 2015-09-29 Jeff is now an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow in the Mathematics Department at Stanford University. My son, Jeff, is graduating this month from the University of California, Berkeley, with a doctorate in Mathematics. His thesis title is “Distribution of … Continue reading

Posted in mathematics, maths, physics, proud dad, Stanford University | Tagged | 3 Comments

Stone STOCHASTICITY Project

(Click on image for a larger one.) See the write-up for details.

Posted in ales, capricious gods, chance, chemistry, games of chance, maths, probability, risk, statistics, stochastics, the right to know, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

United States found liable in Katrina flooding of New Orleans

From the New York Times, the United States government has been found liable for the failure of the walls of a 76-mile-long canal which flooded a substantial portion of New Orleans after the onslaught of Hurricane Katrina. Now the question … Continue reading

Posted in citizenship, climate change, ecology, engineering, environment, ethics, living shorelines, oceanography, politics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, sea level rise, seawalls, temporal myopia, the right to know | Leave a comment