Category Archives: scientific publishing

“Azimuth Backup Project (Part 5)”, upcoming presentation by Prof John Carlos Baez

The post. The Project. The Place. The Conference. The Funders. Thanks to everyone, especially to The Team, to Professor Baez, to the Funders, and to University of California, Riverside. I don’t identify the Team because some don’t want to receive … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, Anthropocene, Azimuth Backup Project, California, citizen data, citizenship, climate data, denial, Donald Trump, Ecology Action, friends and colleagues, global blinding, Hyper Anthropocene, rationality, science denier, scientific publishing, tragedy of the horizon, University of California | Leave a comment

March for Science, Boston, 22 April 2017

Cold and wet. A very typical Massachusetts day in Spring. But great …

Posted in American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Meteorological Association, American Statistical Association, AMETSOC, being carbon dioxide, Buckminster Fuller, Earth Day, Environmental Protection Agency, Hyper Anthropocene, Minsky moment, National Center for Atmospheric Research, NCAR, Principles of Planetary Climate, science, science education, scientific publishing, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Spaceship Earth, Stephen Schneider, Svante Arrhenius, the right to be and act stupid, the right to know, the tragedy of our present civilization, WHOI, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, XKCD | Leave a comment

“You don’t have that option.”

Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson. I think he’s awesome. Marvelous. I saw him in Boston. He and I did not get off well, at the start, because of my being awestruck, and feeling very awkward, and the short time we had … Continue reading

Posted in American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Meteorological Association, American Statistical Association, AMETSOC, Bayesian, citizen data, citizen science, Climate Lab Book, Earth Day, ecological services, ecology, environment, Hyper Anthropocene, Neill deGrasse Tyson, Principles of Planetary Climate, rationality, Ray Pierrehumbert, reason, reasonableness, religion, science, science education, Science magazine, scientific publishing, secularism, Spaceship Earth, sustainability, the right to be and act stupid, the right to know, the tragedy of our present civilization, United States, XKCD | Leave a comment

p-values and hypothesis tests: the Bayesian(s) rule

The American Statistical Association of which I am a longtime member issued an important statement today which will hopefully move statistical practice in engineering and especially in the sciences away from the misleading practice of using p-values and hypothesis tests. … Continue reading

Posted in approximate Bayesian computation, arXiv, Bayes, Bayesian, Bayesian inversion, bollocks, Christian Robert, climate, complex systems, data science, Frequentist, information theoretic statistics, likelihood-free, Markov Chain Monte Carlo, MCMC, Monte Carlo Statistical Methods, population biology, rationality, reasonableness, science, scientific publishing, statistical dependence, statistics, stochastics, Student t distribution | Leave a comment

No turning back: On the effectiveness of artificially removing emitted CO2 from atmosphere for remediating climate disruption

A new paper, by Tokarska and Zickfeld, just published in the Institute Of Physics (“IOP”) Environmental Research Letters examines the question of what happens to climate change and disruption should, at some time, we collectively decide it’s too bad and … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, Anthropocene, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide capture, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, climate disruption, denial, diffusion processes, dynamical systems, environment, ethics, forecasting, fossil fuels, games of chance, geoengineering, geophysics, global warming, Hyper Anthropocene, ignorance, James Hansen, oceanography, physics, Principles of Planetary Climate, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, scientific publishing, sea level rise, statistics, sustainability, the right to know, thermodynamics, zero carbon | 2 Comments

“Allocating a 2° C cumulative carbon budget to countries”: Gignac and Matthews

Abstract Recent estimates of the global carbon budget, or allowable cumulative CO2 emissions consistent with a given level of climate warming, have the potential to inform climate mitigation policy discussions aimed at maintaining global temperatures below 2° C. This raises … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, Anthropocene, Boston Ethical Society, bridge to nowhere, carbon dioxide, Carbon Tax, chance, chemistry, citizen science, citizenship, civilization, clean disruption, climate, climate change, climate disruption, climate education, climate justice, compassion, conservation, consumption, decentralized energy, demand-side solutions, destructive economic development, ecology, education, energy, energy reduction, environment, ethics, forecasting, fossil fuel divestment, fossil fuels, geophysics, global warming, humanism, Hyper Anthropocene, ignorance, investment in wind and solar energy, IPCC, meteorology, mitigation, open source scientific software, physical materialism, physics, population biology, prediction, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, science education, scientific publishing, sociology, solar power, sustainability, temporal myopia, the right to know, time series, UNFCCC, UU Humanists, wind power | Leave a comment

Why decentralized electrical power has to win, no matter what Elon Musk says, and utilities are doomed

Image | Posted on by | 3 Comments

“Storm-proven forecasting gets yearlong trial”

Storm-studying scientists have made their next-generation forecasting system available online so the wider weather community can put it to the test. After using the real-time system during short-lived field research campaigns, developers at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) … Continue reading

Posted in citizen science, ensembles, ENSO, environment, forecasting, geophysics, maths, meteorology, NCAR, open data, physics, precipitation, science, science education, scientific publishing, spatial statistics, statistics | Leave a comment

Earth Day, my hope

Posted in carbon dioxide, Carl Sagan, Charles Darwin, citizen science, citizenship, civilization, clean disruption, climate, climate change, climate education, compassion, conservation, Darwin Day, demand-side solutions, ecology, economics, education, efficiency, energy reduction, environment, ethics, forecasting, fossil fuel divestment, geophysics, history, humanism, investing, investment in wind and solar energy, IPCC, mathematics, maths, meteorology, NCAR, NOAA, oceanography, open data, open source scientific software, physics, politics, population biology, Principles of Planetary Climate, privacy, probit regression, R, rationality, Ray Pierrehumbert, reasonableness, reproducible research, risk, science, science education, scientific publishing, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, sociology, the right to know, Unitarian Universalism, UU Humanists, WHOI, wind power | Leave a comment

“Merchants of Doubt: What Climate Deniers Learned from Big Tobacco”

Posted in carbon dioxide, climate, climate change, climate education, ecology, economics, education, environment, ethics, fossil fuel divestment, geophysics, history, humanism, investing, IPCC, meteorology, new forms of scientific peer review, obfuscating data, physics, politics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, science education, scientific publishing, sociology | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The designers of our climate

Originally posted on …and Then There's Physics:
Okay, I finally succumbed and actually waded through some of the new paper by Monckton, Soon, Legates & Briggs called Why models run hot: results from an irreducibly simple climate model. I…

Posted in astrophysics, bridge to nowhere, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide capture, carbon dioxide sequestration, Carbon Tax, Carl Sagan, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, climate education, differential equations, ecology, economics, engineering, environment, ethics, forecasting, fossil fuel divestment, geoengineering, geophysics, humanism, IPCC, mathematics, mathematics education, maths, meteorology, methane, NASA, NCAR, Neill deGrasse Tyson, NOAA, oceanography, open data, open source scientific software, physics, politics, population biology, Principles of Planetary Climate, probabilistic programming, R, rationality, reasonableness, reproducible research, risk, science, science education, scientific publishing, sociology, solar power, statistics, testing, the right to know | Leave a comment

Codium fragile, for Saturday, 17th January 2015

With today’s post, I’m beginning a new tradition at 667 per cm, posting a potpourri of short observations collected during the week, not necessarily having dense citations to work which inspired them. (Although if interested, please do ask and I’ll … Continue reading

Posted in art, arXiv, astronomy, astrophysics, atheism, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide capture, Carbon Tax, Carl Sagan, chemistry, citizen science, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, climate education, conservation, consumption, decentralized electric power generation, demand-side solutions, ecology, economics, energy, engineering, environment, forecasting, fossil fuel divestment, geoengineering, history, humanism, investment in wind and solar energy, IPCC, meteorology, methane, microgrids, NASA, Neill deGrasse Tyson, new forms of scientific peer review, NOAA, notes, nuclear power, oceanography, open data, open source scientific software, physics, politics, Principles of Planetary Climate, rationality, reasonableness, reproducible research, science, science education, scientific publishing, sociology, the right to know | Leave a comment

On the dispensibility of causes

John D Norton wrote “Causation as folk science” in 2003, a piece which highlights the limited role of Aristotlean and Kantian causation in modern science, something which I’ve felt for many years. My perspective is that there’s nothing cause-and-effect in … Continue reading

Posted in civilization, education, rationality, reasonableness, science, science education, scientific publishing, statistics | Tagged | Leave a comment

open access for everything

In addition to Larry Wasserman’s article, and the power of arXiv.org, there are these two interesting YouTube interviews with Jack Andraka.

Posted in mathematical publishing, science education, scientific publishing, the right to know | Leave a comment

Climate Science: What You Need To Know

From Phil Plait’s Bad Astronomy blog.

Posted in astronomy, astrophysics, carbon dioxide, chemistry, citizen science, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate education, consumption, ecology, economics, education, energy, engineering, environment, forecasting, fossil fuel divestment, geophysics, humanism, investment in wind and solar energy, meteorology, methane, NOAA, oceanography, physics, politics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, science education, scientific publishing, solar power, the right to know, wind power | Leave a comment

Global temperatures, Friday, 21st November 2014

From the University of Maine’s Climate Reanalyzer. Hat tip to Carl Safina.

Posted in biology, climate, climate education, forecasting, geophysics, meteorology, NOAA, oceanography, physics, rationality, science, scientific publishing, the right to know | Leave a comment

Ray Pierrehumbert on the new U.S.-China climate deal

Professor Pierrehumbert offers his thoughts in Slate. He’s the author of Principles of Planetary Climate which is, as far as I’m concerned, the definitive climate book.

Posted in astronomy, astrophysics, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide capture, Carbon Tax, chemistry, citizen science, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate education, conservation, consumption, demand-side solutions, differential equations, ecology, economics, education, efficiency, energy, energy reduction, engineering, environment, forecasting, geoengineering, geophysics, investing, investment in wind and solar energy, IPCC, mathematics, maths, meteorology, methane, NCA, NOAA, oceanography, physics, politics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, scientific publishing, solar power, statistics, wind power | Tagged | Leave a comment

Defeating “The Index” in Gilbert, Arizona

“Home rule” means a lot of things. But, as the Catholic hierarchy in Rome once did, the educational authorities of Gilbert, Arizona, USA, are apparently taking it one step too far. Dan Satterfield reports that certain pages in a biology … Continue reading

Posted in atheism, biology, Boston Ethical Society, citizenship, ecology, education, environment, humanism, physics, rationality, reasonableness, science, scientific publishing, the right to know | Leave a comment

A conclusion that “the hiatus” in global land surface warming is natural variability

Lovejoy provides conclusive statistical evidence, free of use of climate models, that the so-called “hiatus” in global land surface warming is due to natural variability and is decidedly not a suspension of global climate change. See S. Lovejoy, “Return periods … Continue reading

Posted in carbon dioxide, climate, climate education, forecasting, geophysics, IPCC, maths, meteorology, oceanography, physics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, scientific publishing, statistics | 1 Comment

“What will this winter be like? Two Forecasts for Winter in your Region”

What will this winter be like? Two Forecasts for Winter in your Region.

Posted in environment, forecasting, geophysics, meteorology, physics, rationality, science, scientific publishing, statistics | Leave a comment

Brian Hayes on clear climate models for the curious public

American Scientst has a nice article by Brian Hayes recounting the basic physics of climate, and then recommending both public engagement with clear, simple climate models, at least by the curious and scientifically literate, and the development of models which … Continue reading

Posted in astrophysics, carbon dioxide, Carl Sagan, cat1, citizen science, civilization, climate, climate education, conservation, consumption, differential equations, education, energy, environment, forecasting, geophysics, mathematics, maths, meteorology, oceanography, physics, reasonableness, risk, science, scientific publishing, statistics | Leave a comment

Mr.Chose José, a little rough, but we need rough

Posted in art, carbon dioxide, civilization, climate, climate education, ecology, environment, forecasting, geophysics, methane, physics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, scientific publishing | Leave a comment

Stephen Schneider Lecture (GC43E 01) – AGU 2013 Fall Meeting — Gavin Schmidt

This is really excellent, especially in the sketching of bounds for scientists between educating on scientific subjects, such as climate change, and just “contributing to the noise”.

Posted in citizenship, civilization, climate, climate education, ecology, economics, education, engineering, environment, forecasting, geophysics, meteorology, physics, politics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, scientific publishing | Leave a comment

testing how one might do bibliographic references on WordPress without plugins

References Shotton D. (2013). Open citations. Nature 502: 295–297. http://www.nature.com/news/publishing-open-citations-1.13937. doi:10.1038/502295a. Peroni S and Shotton D (2012). FaBiO and CiTO: ontologies for describing bibliographic resources and citations. Web Semantics: Science, Services and Agents on the World Wide Web. 17: 33-34. … Continue reading

Posted in engineering, mathematical publishing, mathematics, science, scientific publishing, statistics | Tagged , | 2 Comments