Atmospheric concentration of CO2 as a function of altitude

Note that water vapor is essentially at zero concentration above the tropopause, which is at most 16 km high (it varies with latitude and season) because it is too cold for water to survive as gas, or even as liquid. In contrast, direct measurements have shown that CO2 persists, and even varies with concentrations at lower altitudes. See
figures below.
FoucherEtAl_2015-08-04_151220
(Click on image for larger graphic.)
Aoki_et_al_2015-08-04_152403
(Click on image for larger graphic.)

(Updated 7th May 2021)

About ecoquant

See https://667-per-cm.net/about. Retired data scientist and statistician. Now working projects in quantitative ecology and, specifically, phenology of Bryophyta and technical methods for their study.
This entry was posted in carbon dioxide, climate, climate change, climate data, climate disruption, environment, fossil fuels, geophysics, global warming, Hyper Anthropocene, IPCC, meteorology, open data, physics, Principles of Planetary Climate, science, science education, the right to know, time series. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Atmospheric concentration of CO2 as a function of altitude

  1. chaamjamal says:

    HOW DOES THE CO2 CONCENTRATION VARY VERTICALLY ACROSS THE TROPOSPHERE FROM MID TROPOSPHERE TO TROPOPAUSE?
    THANKS

    • ecoquant says:

      Abshire, James B., Anand Ramanathan, Haris Riris, Jianping Mao, Graham R. Allan, William E. Hasselbrack, Clark J. Weaver, and Edward V. Browell. “Airborne measurements of CO2 column concentration and range using a pulsed direct-detection IPDA lidar.” Remote Sensing 6, no. 1 (2014): 443-469.

      See newly added table at bottom of post showing summary from the above reference.

      CO2 concentration depends upon geography because of surface production or absorption. In the case of Iowa, it’s agriculture.

      Tropopause is generally accepted to be about 10 km.

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