Category Archives: chemistry

“Oh no, not again” (from ATTP)

Response to a paper by Hermann Harde, from Ken Rice at … And Then There’s Physics. Dr Rice cites two other responses as well: One by Gavin Schmidt at RealClimate. One from 2011 by Gavin Cawley from the University of … Continue reading

Posted in American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Meteorological Association, American Statistical Association, AMETSOC, atmosphere, being carbon dioxide, Carbon Cycle, carbon dioxide, chemistry, climate, climate disruption, climate education, Climate Lab Book, David Archer, diffusion, diffusion processes, fossil fuels, geophysics, Global Carbon Project, greenhouse gases, ignorance, physics, Principles of Planetary Climate, Ray Pierrehumbert, science, science education | Leave a comment

Getting back to 350 ppm CO2: You can’t go home again

(Major update of this piece included below.) You can’t. It’ll cost much more than 23 times 40 times the Gross World Product to do it. And, in any case, you need to go to where you need to be to … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Anthropocene, atmosphere, bollocks, bridge to nowhere, Carbon Cycle, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide capture, carbon dioxide sequestration, Carbon Worshipers, chemistry, clear air capture of carbon dioxide, climate, climate change, climate disruption, climate economics, corporate litigation on damage from fossil fuel emissions, David Archer, diffusion, diffusion processes, ecological services, ecology, economics, engineering, environment, environmental law, fossil fuels, geoengineering, global warming, greenhouse gases, Hyper Anthropocene, leaving fossil fuels in the ground, methane, Our Children's Trust, physics, rationality, reason, reasonableness, science, Spaceship Earth, the right to be and act stupid, Wally Broecker, zero carbon | 5 Comments

Absorption of long wave, or thermal radiation by CO2 at 667 per cm

From time to time, I engage with science deniers on the Web, typically in Comment sections, and primarily regarding aspects of climate science or physics. Some think this to be a waste of time, but, as I enjoy debating (have … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropocene, astrophysics, atmosphere, Bill Nye, carbon dioxide, chemistry, citizen science, climate, climate change, climate data, climate disruption, climate education, denial, evidence, geophysics, global warming, Hyper Anthropocene, ignorance, physics, rationality, reasonableness, science, science denier, science education, spectra, SuperCorrector1, Svante Arrhenius | Leave a comment

reblog: “The Big 3: CO2, CH4, N2O”, from Tamino

Originally posted on Open Mind:
The four greenhouse gases with the strongest effect on climate through their climate forcing are water vapor (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) (I’m omitting halocarbons, which come in a wide…

Posted in Anthropocene, carbon dioxide, chemistry, climate, climate change, climate data, climate disruption, di-nitrogen oxide, diffusion, geophysics, Hyper Anthropocene, methane, mitigation, science, Tamino, water vapor | Leave a comment

“Number density, not mixing ratio”, from Eli

From this post: There is a cute little number called Loschmidt, the number of molecules in a cubic meter of air at 1 atm and 0° C, 2.6867774(47) x 1025 molecules/m3 … Eli Rabett provides a neat way to see … Continue reading

Posted in astrophysics, Boltzmann, carbon dioxide, chemistry, climate, climate change, climate disruption, climate education, Eli Rabett, environment, evidence, geophysics, global warming, Loschmidt, meteorology, methane, physics, Principles of Planetary Climate, science, theoretical physics, thermodynamics | Leave a comment

Carbon Worshipers and Worship

There’s agitation and angst in some circles regarding the proper term to dub individuals who, however technical their training, reject the conclusions of climate science, physics, and even Exxon from the 1970s. (Graphs are from Greg Laden’s blog.) There’s denial, … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropocene, atheism, bridge to nowhere, carbon dioxide, chemistry, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, climate data, climate models, Cult of Carbon, denial, energy, environment, Exxon, fossil fuels, geophysics, global warming, Hyper Anthropocene, ignorance, IPCC, meteorology, oceanography, physical materialism, physics, rationality, reasonableness, science, UNFCCC, UU Humanists, zero carbon | 3 Comments

Super Hydrophobic Materials

Hat tip to Jeff Galkowski, my son, post-doc in Mathematics at McGill University and at Stanford University, a University of Rochester grad, who recently received a doctorate in Mathematics from University of California, Berkeley.

Posted in chemistry, materials science, McGill University, physics, proud dad, science, Stanford University, University of California Berkeley, University of Rochester | Leave a comment

“Allocating a 2° C cumulative carbon budget to countries”: Gignac and Matthews

Abstract Recent estimates of the global carbon budget, or allowable cumulative CO2 emissions consistent with a given level of climate warming, have the potential to inform climate mitigation policy discussions aimed at maintaining global temperatures below 2° C. This raises … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, Anthropocene, Boston Ethical Society, bridge to nowhere, carbon dioxide, Carbon Tax, chance, chemistry, citizen science, citizenship, civilization, clean disruption, climate, climate change, climate disruption, climate education, climate justice, compassion, conservation, consumption, decentralized energy, demand-side solutions, destructive economic development, ecology, education, energy, energy reduction, environment, ethics, forecasting, fossil fuel divestment, fossil fuels, geophysics, global warming, humanism, Hyper Anthropocene, ignorance, investment in wind and solar energy, IPCC, meteorology, mitigation, open source scientific software, physical materialism, physics, population biology, prediction, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, science education, scientific publishing, sociology, solar power, sustainability, temporal myopia, the right to know, time series, UNFCCC, UU Humanists, wind power | Leave a comment

rappin’ the truth

(Hat tip to the Yale Climate Connections project.)

Posted in Bill Nye, biology, Boston, carbon dioxide, chemistry, citizen science, climate, climate change, climate disruption, climate education, ecology, education, environment, evolution, geophysics, global warming, investment in wind and solar energy, Neill deGrasse Tyson, physics, population biology, rationality, reasonableness, science, science education | 1 Comment

carbon dioxide and saturation

One of the “climate zombies” that get’s trotted out from time to time and at places on the Internet is the argument of Knut Ångström, trying to rebut the calculations of Svante Arrhenius regarding the impact a doubling of carbon … Continue reading

Posted in astrophysics, carbon dioxide, chemistry, climate, climate change, climate disruption, climate education, climate zombies, geophysics, meteorology, physics, Ray Pierrehumbert, science, science education | Leave a comment

Stone STOCHASTICITY Project

(Click on image for a larger one.) See the write-up for details.

Posted in ales, capricious gods, chance, chemistry, games of chance, maths, probability, risk, statistics, stochastics, the right to know, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Eli Rabett on the APS “Draft Statement on Earth’s Changing Climate”

This is from Rabett Run. The American Physical Society (“APS”) is working on a draft statement on climate change. Compared to other scientific organizations (and my own primary society, the American Statistical Association), it’s sure taking them a long time. … Continue reading

Posted in carbon dioxide, Carbon Tax, chemistry, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, climate education, diffusion processes, ecology, environment, fossil fuel divestment, geophysics, meteorology, methane, NCAR, NOAA, oceanography, open data, politics, Principles of Planetary Climate, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, science education, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, sea level rise, solar power, testing, the right to know, time series, WHOI, wind power | Leave a comment

We are trying. And the bitterest result is to have so-called colleagues align themselves with the Koch brothers

I attended a 350.org meeting tonight. One group A group presenting there called “Fighting Against Natural Gas” applauded themselves for assailing Senator Whitehouse of Rhode Island for his supportive position on natural gas pipelines. Now, I am no friend of … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropocene, astrophysics, Boston Ethical Society, bridge to nowhere, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide sequestration, Carbon Tax, chemistry, citizenship, climate, climate change, climate education, consumption, decentralized electric power generation, demand-side solutions, ecology, economics, energy reduction, engineering, forecasting, fossil fuel divestment, investment in wind and solar energy, IPCC, JAGS, meteorology, methane, model comparison, NASA, natural gas, NCAR, Neill deGrasse Tyson, oceanography, open data, physics, politics, population biology, Principles of Planetary Climate, Python 3, R, rationality, reasonableness, reproducible research, risk, science, science education, Scripps Institution of Oceanography | 4 Comments

Models don’t over-estimate warming?

Originally posted on …and Then There's Physics:
I thought I might write about the new paper by Jochem Marotzke and Piers Forster called Forcing, feedback and internal variability in global temperature trends. It’s already been discussed in a Carbon…

Posted in astrophysics, carbon dioxide, chemistry, citizen science, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, climate education, differential equations, diffusion processes, ecology, education, energy, forecasting, geophysics, IPCC, mathematics, meteorology, model comparison, NASA, NCAR, NOAA, oceanography, physics, Principles of Planetary Climate, rationality, Ray Pierrehumbert, reasonableness, science, statistics, the right to know | 1 Comment

Codium fragile, for Saturday, 17th January 2015

With today’s post, I’m beginning a new tradition at 667 per cm, posting a potpourri of short observations collected during the week, not necessarily having dense citations to work which inspired them. (Although if interested, please do ask and I’ll … Continue reading

Posted in art, arXiv, astronomy, astrophysics, atheism, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide capture, Carbon Tax, Carl Sagan, chemistry, citizen science, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, climate education, conservation, consumption, decentralized electric power generation, demand-side solutions, ecology, economics, energy, engineering, environment, forecasting, fossil fuel divestment, geoengineering, history, humanism, investment in wind and solar energy, IPCC, meteorology, methane, microgrids, NASA, Neill deGrasse Tyson, new forms of scientific peer review, NOAA, notes, nuclear power, oceanography, open data, open source scientific software, physics, politics, Principles of Planetary Climate, rationality, reasonableness, reproducible research, science, science education, scientific publishing, sociology, the right to know | Leave a comment

“Atmospheric lifetime of fossil fuel carbon dioxide” (2009)

These basic facts do not appear to be widely known, so it’s a good thing this classic paper is now available in a new, easily accessible form. David Archer, Michael Eby, Victor Brovkin, Andy Ridgwell, Long Cao, Uwe Mikolajewicz, Ken … Continue reading

Posted in astrophysics, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide capture, carbon dioxide sequestration, Carbon Tax, chemistry, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate education, conservation, consumption, demand-side solutions, differential equations, ecology, economics, education, energy, energy reduction, engineering, environment, fossil fuel divestment, geoengineering, geophysics, IPCC, meteorology, methane, natural gas, NCAR, NOAA, oceanography, physics, Principles of Planetary Climate, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, science education | 1 Comment

Climate Science: What You Need To Know

From Phil Plait’s Bad Astronomy blog.

Posted in astronomy, astrophysics, carbon dioxide, chemistry, citizen science, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate education, consumption, ecology, economics, education, energy, engineering, environment, forecasting, fossil fuel divestment, geophysics, humanism, investment in wind and solar energy, meteorology, methane, NOAA, oceanography, physics, politics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, science education, scientific publishing, solar power, the right to know, wind power | Leave a comment

Ray Pierrehumbert on the new U.S.-China climate deal

Professor Pierrehumbert offers his thoughts in Slate. He’s the author of Principles of Planetary Climate which is, as far as I’m concerned, the definitive climate book.

Posted in astronomy, astrophysics, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide capture, Carbon Tax, chemistry, citizen science, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate education, conservation, consumption, demand-side solutions, differential equations, ecology, economics, education, efficiency, energy, energy reduction, engineering, environment, forecasting, geoengineering, geophysics, investing, investment in wind and solar energy, IPCC, mathematics, maths, meteorology, methane, NCA, NOAA, oceanography, physics, politics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, scientific publishing, solar power, statistics, wind power | Tagged | Leave a comment

“Frequency-comb-based remote sensing of greenhouse gases over kilometer air paths”

G. B. Rieker, F. R. Giorgetta, W. C. Swann, J. Kofler, A. M. Zolot, L. C. Sinclair, E. Baumann, C. Cromer, G. Petron, C. Sweeney, P. P. Tans, I. Coddington, And N. R. Newbury, “Frequency-comb-based remote sensing of greenhouse gases … Continue reading

Posted in carbon dioxide, Carbon Tax, chemistry, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate education, consumption, ecology, economics, engineering, environment, geophysics, meteorology, methane, municipal solid waste, physics, risk, science | Leave a comment

Emission reductions since 1990

It is popular to gage progress towards greenhouse gas emissions reductions by how much they have been reduced since 1990. This is done by the federal government, and it is done by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It is the wrong … Continue reading

Posted in astrophysics, carbon dioxide, Carbon Tax, chemistry, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate education, conservation, consumption, demand-side solutions, ecology, economics, energy reduction, engineering, environment, forecasting, geoengineering, geophysics, history, investing, mathematics, maths, meteorology, methane, NASA, nuclear power, oceanography, optimization, physics, politics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, solar power, WHOI, wind power, Wordpress | Leave a comment

Natural gas as fuel: Thumbs down!

I never liked the idea of using natural gas as a “bridge energy fuel”. It seems to me unrealistic to invest substantially in additional CO2 producing infrastructure which will simply need to be stopped and teared down a lot sooner … Continue reading

Posted in carbon dioxide, Carbon Tax, chemistry, climate, climate education, demand-side solutions, efficiency, energy reduction, engineering, environment, forecasting, geophysics, meteorology, methane, physics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science | Tagged | Leave a comment

Are we making the argument harder than we have to?

Sure, correlation is not causation, but it is causation if there’s independent physical evidence that there is a link. And we have plenty of that. Much of the doubt and discussion these days is about attribution of surface warming to … Continue reading

Posted in carbon dioxide, chemistry, climate, climate education, ecology, environment, forecasting, geophysics, mathematics, meteorology, oceanography, physics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science, statistics | Tagged | 1 Comment

The Alternative to Divestment from Fossil Fuels …

From the great XKCD … (Click image to enlarge.)

Posted in chemistry, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate education, conservation, consumption, demand-side solutions, ecology, economics, education, engineering, environment, geoengineering, geophysics, investing, optimization, physics, politics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science | Tagged | Leave a comment

“Without even thinking very hard …”: My favorite post from RealClimate

Professor Ray Pierrehumbert’s “Open Letter to Steve Levitt” has to be my favorite post on RealClimate. Not only does it do “Consider a spherical cow” kinds of quick calculation, in a Socratic manner it exposes the manipulation which climate deniers or, if … Continue reading

Posted in chemistry, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate education, ecology, economics, education, efficiency, energy, engineering, environment, geoengineering, geophysics, history, meteorology, notes, oceanography, physics, politics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, science | Tagged | Leave a comment

“On the Lyapunov function for complex-balanced mass-action systems” Hat tip to the Azimuth Project and thanks to Manoj Gopalkrishnan for this interesting article.

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Correlation, causation, and coupled pairs of differential equations

An aspect of paleoclimate evidence to which Professor Jennifer Francis alludes in her recent report on Arctic amplification is the close mutual modeling which Earth surface temperature and carbon dioxide concentration exhibit during the recent geologic past. Since relative timings … Continue reading

Posted in chemistry, climate, climate education, ecology, economics, engineering, environment, geoengineering, geophysics, mathematics, meteorology, oceanography, physics, rationality, reasonableness, statistics, stochastic algorithms | Leave a comment

Professor Richard Alley on Sustainability

Posted in chemistry, climate, climate education, economics, environment, geoengineering, geophysics, history, investing, oceanography, physics, rationality, reasonableness, science | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Nerds vs. Breaking Bad

Very worthwhile to read Okazaki’s Nerds vs. Breaking Bad. I have just watched the first three episodes of this show and I have mixed feelings about it. I’m not giving it a review here but just want to make three … Continue reading

Posted in chemistry, compassion, education, engineering, history, notes, rationality, reasonableness, science | 2 Comments

Radiative Forcing: Where We Stand

The RealClimate blog has a very nice history of how these have developed today.

Posted in chemistry, climate, climate education, environment, geophysics, meteorology, science | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

More than you ever wanted to know about carbon dioxide

Bob Henson conveys key features of carbon dioxide at the recent crossing of a measurement series past the 400 parts-per-million point. Hat tip to the ever interesting Wild Weather Dan, Dr Dan Satterfield, for the link. Incidentally, the “667 per … Continue reading

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